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Government has announced a website, urging “Use this service to find information about the different experiences of people from a variety of ethnic backgrounds. It gathers data collected by government in one place, making it available to the public, specialists and charities.”

The Guardian has collated some expert responses to the release of statistics by the Race Equality Audit conducted by the Cabinet Office  notes

 Hugh MuirEven a broken clock is right twice a day. It is in that light that we should view Theresa May’s unveiling of the latest race equality audit, with the accompanying website. Information is power. We can whinge to the point of saturation about individual disproportions in schools, or health, or policing or housing, but the big picture is much more powerful. That’s why those who fare quite well from inequality didn’t really want us to see it. We knew it would be grisly. But not as unsightly as this.

We know black pupils are permanently excluded from school three times as often as white British pupils. Why is that? That at key stage 2, 71% of Chinese primary school pupils met the standard for reading, writing and maths, but just 54% of white British pupils and 13% of white Gypsy and Roma pupils did. How’s that explained? . . .

Faiza Shaheen

. . . There is something fishy about the way in which some of these statistics are reported. There is a disparity in educational outcomes for white children against black children on free school meals, partly explained by the huge improvement in London schools, but the differences between ethnicities in the same class are tiny compared with the differences between the richest and the worst-off . . . click here.

The Race Audit provided the following aggregate data on the labour market:

in 2016, just over 4% of White people were unemployed, which is lower than the rate of unemployment for people from all Other ethnic groups

  • the group with the highest rate of unemployment in 2016 was Pakistani/Bangladeshi (11%), and the group with the lowest rate was White Other (4%)
  • unemployment rates were higher for people from ethnic minorities (other than White ethnic minorities) than for White people across the country; these differences were largest in London (9% for ethnic minorities and 4% for White), the West Midlands (11% for ethnic minorities and 5% for White) and the North West (9% for ethnic minorities and 5% for White)

    click here.

 

 

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