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The recently published report [December 2015]  of  the Commission on Religion in British Public Life (CORAB) notes,

Hate crimes against Muslims operate in much the same way as antisemitic or anti-Sikh hate crimes – they are often perpetrated by the same people, usually involve the same kinds of violence and abusive and threatening language, are condoned or encouraged in the same milieu of onlookers and bystanders, inflict the same kinds of bodily harm, do the same kinds of criminal damage to property and sacred places, and have the same demoralising intimidating and traumatic effects on victims, and on the victims’ families and communities.  Yet incitement to anti-Muslim hate crime is more difficult to prosecute than incitement to antisemitic or anti-Sikh hate crime.This is a further anomaly that needs to be rectifed. This is because Jews and Sikhs are protected under the incitement to racial hatred provisions in Part III of the Public Order Act 1986, whereas Muslims are not. Muslims may, it is true,seek protection under the Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2006; but the provisions under this are signifcantly weaker than those which apply under the Public Order Act.Also, there is a freedom of expression defence in the 2006 provisions which makes it more diffcult to prosecute for inciting religious hatred than it is for inciting racial hatred. A further example of the disparity in protection is to do with harassment. Jews and Sikhs are protected against harassment in the provision of goods and services (on the grounds of race), but members of other religion or belief groups are not.

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