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Adam Belaon’s report, ‘A critical analysis of the Prevent counter-radicalisation model implemented in primary schools’, examines CT practices the London Borough of Waltham Forest’s primary schools in particular, noting

The ‘Building Resilience through Integration and Trust’ (BRIT) programme is a flagship project run by Waltham Forest council for primary schools in the Borough. The council’s website outlines five sessions designed to “discuss and address the complex issues of multiple identities, social exclusion and belonging” (The Hub, 2015). These were delivered to classes of 9- and 10-year olds by a representative from the council. The London Borough of Waltham Forest (LBWF) is considered to be one of the Prevent priority areas and a leader in delivery of the Prevent strategy. The BRIT project is promoted as being an extremely important initiative by the Borough for the purposes of social cohesion, and not a part of the Prevent program. However, this view is contested by the parents who raised concerns that it was a hidden Prevent programme when the project was in the headlines in May 2015. Details of a survey emerged; the council was accused of using this as a profiling tool to measure vulnerability to radicalisation[…]

The evidence gathered in this report clearly points to a pattern of ethnic profiling in counter-radicalisation policy in Britain’s schools. The e-mails released under the Freedom of Information Act validate concerns of parents and the wider community towards counter-radicalisation policies. Despite the council’s insistence that the questionnaires were designed to assess a baseline and that they would be anonymous, this was contradicted by the questions themselves – asking for names and religions of friends – as well as in correspondence between local government officials and the school. click here.

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