Share this page
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Rate this post

From the BBC: Louise Casey is to lead a review into improving the integration of Britain’s minorities as part of a broader effort to tackle extremism […] Perhaps Casey’s real value to politicians – and the reason she keeps being asked to produce reports on difficult social problems – is that she say is able to say things in public that they think privately (that social workers are too “soft” for example).

She has the authority of someone who has got her hands dirty – she would go down a “crack alley” to find out why someone was taking drugs, a friend told a BBC Radio 4 profile – and the sort of drive to get the job done that is highly prized in the civil service.

But she also appears to have a handle on the emotional lives of those she is trying to help.

“They’ve got trouble in their souls, trouble in their heart, troubles in their head,” she said of the young single mothers who were the focus of the troubled families unit, arguing that their problems stemmed from “not having enough love or of having too much pain”.

Her latest role – to produce “a comprehensive review into boosting opportunity and integration to bring Britain together as one nation”, which David Cameron hopes will lead to more people from ethnic and minority backgrounds feeling they have a stake in society – must be her toughest, most wide-ranging and politically sensitive challenge yet.

One thing is certain though – she won’t sugarcoat her conclusions. click here.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •