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Biographical Data :

Name :Tipu Sultan
Period :1750 - 1799
Biographical detail : A great ruler of Mysore, India.

Tipu Sultan succeeded his father, Hyder Ali Khan, in 1782. During the American War of independence he sided with the French against the English, but due to breakout of the French Revolution he was left alone.

In 1792 Tipu Sultan had to make peace with the English by delivering his two sons as hostages to Lord Cornwallis and by paying 3 million Pound sterling. This was a serious blow to Tipu. But very soon Tipu was able to build up his power again, paid the indemnity, and got his sons back.

Tipu Sultan was a great patriot and like his father realised the danger of letting the British become stronger. Although much of the period of his rule was given to war with the Marhattas, the Nizam and the British, he made his state secure and peaceful with benevolent rule. He was innovative and far-sighted ruler – a modernising technocrat who used the weapons of the west against their inventors.

He was an enlightened ruler who treated his non-Muslim subjects generously. When the great Sringeri temple was destroyed by a Marathas raiding party, Tipu sent funds for its rebuilding.

Tipu built a chain of excellent roads and constructed tanks and dams to promote agriculture. He introduced new industries, promoted trade and commerce on a large scale. He sent envoys to southern China to bring back silkworm eggs and established sericulture in Mysore – an innovation that still enriches the region today. He created what amounted to a state trading company with its own ships and factories dotted across the Gulf. Bangalore Summer Palace still survives and is a remnant of his grand rule.

Tipu Sultan patronised the arts and his fondness for literature was displayed in the collection of over 2,000 books in different languages found in his palace, consisting of various works in Sanskrit language, of 10th century translations of the Qur’an, Manuscript of the history of the Mughal victories, all of which were sent to England after he was killed in the final encounter with the British in 1799 at Sringapatam.

Tipu Sultan was also the author of Futuh-ul-Majahdin and Farmen ba Nam Ali Raja, a collection of letters, which was translated and published by B. Crisp.

Tipu Sultan was born at Devanhalli. From his early years, he was trained in the art of warfare and at the age of 15 he accompanied his father to different military campaigns.
 (Compiler : M. Nauman Khan / Ghulam Mohiuddin)


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