An ignominious tradition . . .

Cory Crider in the Guardian, ‘. . .  Here in the UK, there used to be agreement on this story: fair play. The rule of law. Open justice. The abhorrence of torture. It is all there, in Magna Carta. Britons like to say we taught the world these values. Yet on Tuesday, it was not the government, but the supreme court that struck a blow for these values – against ministers who have fought for half a decade to have them overruled. The judgment concluded years of bitter legal fighting over one of the nastiest episodes of the “war on terror”: the “rendition” (kidnapping) and delivery to Muammar Gaddafi’s Libya of two dissidents, their wives, and their children, in a joint MI6-CIA operation. What British officials were party to when the UK government determined in 2004 that Gaddafi ought to be converted from an enemy to a friend would turn anyone’s stomach . . . It is all very well to say the CIA promises not to torture and that MI6 doesn’t want to – that the internal culture of the intelligence agencies has changed. What happens on the night is often a different story. In 2004, the security services of Britain were all too ready to barter the lives of Bouchar and her unborn son for a supposed advantage in negotiations with Gaddafi. Who is to say that we will respond to the next crisis with our morals intact?’ click here.